How to clean and disinfect

Wear disposable gloves to clean and disinfect.

Clean

Clean surfaces using soap and water. Practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces.

High touch surfaces include:

Tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

Disinfect

Clean the area or item with soap and water or another detergent if it is dirty. Then, use disinfectant.

Recommend use of EPA-registered household disinfectant.

Follow the instructions on the label to ensure safe and effective use of the product.

Many products recommend:

  • Keeping surface wet for a period of time (see product label)
  • Precautions such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.

Diluted household bleach solutions may also be used if appropriate for the surface.

  • Check the label to see if your bleach is intended for disinfection, and ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Some bleaches, such as those designed for safe use on colored clothing or for whitening may not be suitable for disinfection.
  • Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser.
  • Leave solution on the surface for at least 1 minute.

To make a bleach solution, mix:

5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water

OR

4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

Alcohol solutions with at least 70% alcohol may also be used.

Soft surfaces

For soft surfaces such as carpeted floor, rugs, and drapes

Clean the surface using soap and water or with cleaners appropriate for use on these surfaces.

Launder items (if possible) according to the manufacturer’s instructions.Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.

OR

 

Disinfect with an EPA-registered household disinfectant. These disinfectants meet EPA’s criteria for use against COVID-19.

Electronics

For electronics, such as tablets, touch screens, keyboards, remote controls, and ATM machines

Consider putting a wipeable cover on electronics.

Follow manufacturer’s instruction for cleaning and dinfecting.

If no guidance, use alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol. Dry surface thoroughly.

Laundry

For clothing, towels, linens and other items

Launder items according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.

Wear disposable gloves when handling dirty laundry from a person who is sick.

Dirty laundry from a person who is sick can be washed with other people’s items.

Do not shake dirty laundry.

Clean and disinfect clothes hampers according to guidance above for surfaces.

Remove gloves, and wash hands right away.

Cleaning and disinfecting your building or facility if someone is sick

Close off areas used by the person who is sick.

Open outside doors and windows to increase air circulation in the area. Wait 24 hours before you clean or disinfect. If 24 hours is not feasible, wait as long as possible.

 

Clean and disinfect all areas used by the person who is sick, such as offices, bathrooms, common areas, shared electronic equipment like tablets, touch screens, keyboards, remote controls, and ATM machines.

If more than 7 days since the person who is sick visited or used the facility, additional cleaning and disinfection is not necessary.

Continue routing cleaning and disinfection.

When Cleaning

Wear disposable gloves and gowns for all tasks in the cleaning process, including handling trash.

Additional personal protective equipment (PPE) might be required based on the cleaning/disinfectant products being used and whether there is a risk of splash.

Gloves and gowns should be removed carefully to avoid contamination of the wearer and the surrounding area.

Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds.

Always wash immediately after removing gloves and after contact with a person who is sick.

Hand sanitizer: If soap and water are not available and hands are not visibly dirty, an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol may be used. However, if hands are visibly dirty, always wash hands with soap and water.

Additional key times to wash hands include:

After blowing one’s nose, coughing, or sneezing.

After using the restroom.

Before eating or preparing food.

After contact with animals or pets.

Before and after providing routine care for another person who needs assistance (e.g., a child).

Additional Considerations for Employers

Educate workers performing cleaning, laundry, and trash pick-up to recognize the symptoms of COVID-19.

Provide instructions on what to do if they develop symptoms within 14 days after their last possible exposure to the virus.

Develop policies for worker protection and provide training to all cleaning staff on site prior to providing cleaning tasks.

Training should include when to use PPE, what PPE is necessary, how to properly don (put on), use, and doff (take off) PPE, and how to properly dispose of PPE.

Ensure workers are trained on the hazards of the cleaning chemicals used in the workplace in accordance with OSHA’s Hazard Communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200).

Comply with OSHA’s standards on Bloodborne Pathogens (29 CFR 1910.1030), including proper disposal of regulated waste, and PPE (29 CFR 1910.132).

Cleaning and Disinfection for Non-emergency Transport Vehicles

Interim Recommendations for U.S. Non-emergency Transport Vehicles that May Have Transported Passengers with Suspected/Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)

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People who are known or suspected to have COVID-19 may use non-emergency vehicle services, such as passenger vans, accessible vans, and cars, for transportation to receive essential medical care. When transporting a known confirmed positive passenger, it is recommended that drivers wear an N95 respirator or facemask (if a respirator is not available) and eye protection such as a face shield or goggles (as long as they do not create a driving hazard), and the passenger should wear a facemask or cloth face covering. Occupants of these vehicles should avoid or limit close contact (within 6 feet) with others. The use of larger vehicles such as vans is recommended when feasible to allow greater social (physical) distance between vehicle occupants. Additionally, drivers should practice regular hand hygiene, avoid touching their nose, mouth, or eyes, and avoid picking up multiple passengers who would not otherwise be riding together on the same route. CDC recommends that individuals wear cloth face coverings in settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, especially in areas with significant community transmission. Cloth face coverings may prevent people who don’t know they have the virus from transmitting it to others; these face coverings are not surgical masks, respirators, or personal protective equipment (PPE). Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

The following are general guidelines for cleaning and disinfecting these vehicles. Similar guidance can be found for cleaning and disinfecting homescommunity facilities, and EMS vehicles used to transport persons with suspected or confirmed COVID-19.

At a minimum, clean and disinfect commonly touched surfaces in the vehicle at the beginning and end of each shift and between transporting passengers who are visibly sick. Ensure that cleaning and disinfection procedures are followed consistently and correctly, including the provision of adequate ventilation when chemicals are in use. Doors and windows should remain open when cleaning the vehicle. When cleaning and disinfecting, individuals should wear disposable gloves compatible with the products being used as well as any other PPE required according to the product manufacturer’s instructions. Use of a disposable gown is also recommended, if available.

  • For hard non-porous surfaces within the interior of the vehicle such as hard seats, arm rests, door handles, seat belt buckles, light and air controls, doors and windows, and grab handles, clean with detergent or soap and water if the surfaces are visibly dirty, prior to disinfectant application. For disinfection of hard, non-porous surfaces, appropriate disinfectants include:
  • For soft or porous surfaces such as fabric seats, remove any visible contamination, if present, and clean with appropriate cleaners indicated for use on these surfaces. After cleaning, use products that are EPA-approved for use against the virus that causes COVID-19external iconand that are suitable for porous surfaces.
  • For frequently touched electronic surfaces, such as tablets or touch screens used in the vehicle, remove visible dirt, then disinfect following the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products. If no manufacturer guidance is available, consider the use of alcohol-based wipes or sprays containing at least 70% alcohol to disinfect.

Gloves and any other disposable PPE used for cleaning and disinfecting the vehicle should be removed and disposed of after cleaning; wash hands immediately after removal of gloves and PPE with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol if soap and water are not available. If a disposable gown was not worn, work uniforms/clothes worn during cleaning and disinfecting should be laundered afterwards using the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely. Wash hands after handling laundry.